Posted by: The Amoeba | February 15, 2009

Recession? What Recession? – Part 2.

(For Part 1, go here.)

At the church we attended today (15 February 2009), the leaders spoke of service to those less fortunate. Yeah, you’ve heard it before. It’s like those tag lines that are breeding like pestilence flies under corporate logos. Service To Those Less Fortunate®. Like Just Do It®, or Have it your way®, or Your Potential. Our Passion®. At least that last one’s honest, if incomplete. Your Profit Potential. Our Passion For Putting It In Our Pockets®.

But for a short while, I thought maybe they really meant it this time. For they challenged the parishioners to live less large. Because they realized that, in a world of declining resources, the only (only) way to be able to reach out to others is (assuming that you yourself are not starving) to reach out for less for yourself. And, most hopefully, they spoke of doing just that themselves. Riding the bus instead of driving. Walking instead of riding the bus …

And then one of them tried walking. Too much too soon, as is usual for the newly enthusiastic. Got weary. Footsore. And got advice from the Ecclesiastical Superiors.

On the proper exercises to prepare oneself for walking significant differences (as for any other class of exercise)?

No, sorry.

On the correct “supershoe” to buy.

We’ll set aside the issue of whether the $200 sneakers are made with slave labor for now, with your permission. It’s unclear whether the major companies still run sweatshops anyway, and given both the skill of the corporations at manipulating the media and the dependence of financially-crippled media outlets on the “spun” news that the corporations generate, it’s nearly certain that, if the sweatshops still exist, We the People will never hear about them. Except through blogs that nobody reads. Which the corporations can safely ignore, promoting themselves as proponents of free speech in the process.

Let’s focus instead on Those Less Fortunate®. For whom the $200 price tag on those sneakers may be equivalent to the mean annual wage in their country. Some of which countries have historically produced the best foot-borne athletes in the world.

The brand of their shoes?

The same as the dishwashers in our house.

Each of us has two of them. And each one of them has five fingers on it.

What recession?

  O Ceallaigh
Copyright © 2009 Felloffatruck Publications. All wrongs deplored.
All opinions expressed are mine, as a private citizen.

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Responses

  1. Uh, you kind of lost me here, but then, I have a belly full of pizza.

  2. No anchovies, Doug. Quilly tells me that, on this post as on several others, I went from step 1 to step 17 again. I think, walking doesn’t require fancy shoes. For billions in this world, like the Ethiopians and Kenyans who became runners long before Reebok discovered them, it takes no shoes at all. In Korea, the Chinese army nearly ran the US UN forces into the sea on cheap canvas sneakers. In January. And about the only thing that the fancy footwear and other gear worn by US forces in the Middle East has accomplished has been to cast the Land of the Free as the Land of Darth Vader’s Minions.

    A person who preaches “shoes” to me is concerned, I think, only with demonstrating that person’s personal superiority, not with creating a new and sustainable society.

    Yes, that means I am one of those who thinks that, if you’re going to tell me about saving the planet, you do have to give up your car. For Darwin, following Malthus, has the correct answer. There is not enough to go around. And because there is not enough to go around, the only (only) sustainable options for humans are to reduce population, and reduce personal consumption, both to predictable (that damned word yet again) sustainable levels.

    As a supposedly “reasoning” species, we can do this for ourselves, and achieve a society that does well in everything except greed set record returns on investments. Or, like any maggot, we can let “acts of ‘God'” do this for us.

    On present evidence, I’m betting on the acts of God.


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